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Habits of Grace: An invitation for you, from Presiding Bishop Curry

March 23, 2020

As we learn how to adjust our lives given the reality of the coronavirus and the request to do our part to slow its spread by practicing social distancing, I invite you to join me each week to take a moment to cultivate a ‘habit of grace.’ A new video meditation will be posted on Mondays through May. These meditations can be watched at any time by clicking here.

 

March 23, 2020:  Pandemic

 

Hello. This past week I came across two passages, one from the Bible, one a poem. The one in the Bible, I was just reading through parts of Matthew's gospel and was reading through the Sermon on the Mount and got to chapter seven where Jesus says, "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you."

In this time when we are all called to physically distance from each other, physical, not social, but physical isolation for the good of each other. I'm mindful of the words of Jesus when he said, "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." Maybe that's a frame for having to live in a time of physical isolation.

The other thing that I came across was a poem. It was in an email from Thistle Farms, a ministry that many of us know, led by Becca Stevens. It was a poem called Pandemic*. It's by a poet named Lynn Ungar, who's also an ordained minister, and in the poem she says:

What if you thought of it
as the Jews consider the Sabbath—
the most sacred of times?
Cease from travel.
Cease from buying and selling.
Give up, just for now,
on trying to make the world
different than it is.
Sing. Pray. Touch only those
to whom you commit your life.
Center down.

And when your body has become still,
reach out with your heart.
Know that we are connected
in ways that are terrifying and beautiful.
(You could hardly deny it now.)
Know that our lives
are in one another’s hands.
(Surely, that has become clear.)
Do not reach out your hands.
Reach out your heart.
Reach out your words.
Reach out all the tendrils
of compassion that move, invisibly,
where we cannot touch.

Promise this world your love–
for better or for worse,
in sickness and in health,
so long as we all shall live.

 

Have a blessed week. God love you and keep the faith.

 

*Used with permission of the author

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Nancy Cox Davidge
Public Affairs Officer