Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe

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May 2, 2008

On April 23, 1908, the cornerstone was laid of what would become the sanctuary of St. James, la chiesa americana (or "American Church") in Florence, Italy. Last week, in friendly cooperation with the City of Florence and the U.S. Consulate, the parish hosted a series of events to commemorate...

March 31, 2008

St. James Episcopal Church in Florence, Italy will be recognized for a century-long ministry serving the local Tuscan and broader Anglican communities when it celebrates the 100th anniversary of the laying of its sanctuary's cornerstone on Sunday, April 27.

Known locally as "The...

January 22, 2008

Bishop Pierre Whalon of the Convocation of American Churches in Europe hosted a January 20 discussion on France Culture radio about the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity and the plight of Iraqi Christians.

The discussion is available in French here as an audio stream (ecoutez) or...

July 5, 2006

The College of Anglican Bishops in Continental Europe (COABICE) met in Oporto, Portugal, July 3-5, at the request of the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr. Rowan Williams, to discuss developing a covenant among the four Anglican jurisdictions in Europe -- the Diocese of Gibraltar in Europe, the...

March 31, 2006

A dozen years ago, a friend contacted the Rev. Fletcher Lowe and asked him to fill in for him as summer supply priest at St. James in Florence, Italy. A decade later, Lowe and his wife, Mary Fran, returned to Florence, where he served as interim for three-and-a-half months.

“We saw a...

March 31, 2006

Affluent American expatriates were responsible for the first organized Episcopal presence on the European continent. The names of Vanderbilt, Drexel, Roosevelt, Harriman, Biddle and Tigge are linked to the first church in Paris. Architectural designer Edward Francis Searles and financier J.P....

December 6, 2004

The Convocation of American Churches in Europe has announced the release of a German/English edition of Selected Liturgies from the Book of Common Prayer. The translation was completed by a team of clergy and lay people at Episcopal parishes in Munich and Frankfurt, and represents an historic...

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