An Episcopal Dictionary of the Church

A - Z Glossary

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Glossary

This hymnal, edited by Robert N. Roth and Nancy L. Roth, consists of 108 hymns or selections of service music from The Hymnal 1982 which were chosen with children's understanding of texts and their vocal abilities in mind. A Teacher's Guide, also edited by the Roths, provides commentaries... Read More »

See Rings.

(Aug. 26, 1908-Aug. 24, 1986). First woman to serve as president of the National Council of Churches. Cynthia Clark was born in Dearborn, Michigan. She grew up in Evanston, Illinois. She earned a B.A. and M.A. from Northwestern University and a Ph.D. from George Washington University in 1957. She... Read More »

(Feb. 19, 1892-July 20, 1970). Preacher, lecturer, and educator. He was born in Halstead, Kansas. Wedel received his B.A. from Oberlin College in 1914, his M.A. from Harvard in 1915, and his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1918. He was instructor in English at Yale, 1919-1922, professor of English at... Read More »

" Booklets printed for Scottish nonjuring Episcopalians that contained the liturgy of the table portion of the eucharistic rite. The first (1722) reproduced that of the 1637 Scottish BCP. Its eucharistic prayer contained elements from the eucharistic prayer of the 1549 BCP that were missing in... Read More »

This observance began on St. Peter's Day, June 29, 1900, when Spencer Jones, a Church of England priest, preached a sermon on closer relations with the Church of Rome. Jones urged that sermons be preached on St. Peter's Day emphasizing Rome as the center of unity. Paul James Wattson, an... Read More »

(Oct. 11, 1759-May 23, 1825). First person ordained by the Church of England for the Episcopal Church after the American Revolution. Weems was born near Herring Creek, Anne Arundel, Maryland. He studied medicine in London and at the University of Edinburgh but never practiced. Weems was ordained... Read More »

(b. Jan. 18, 1920). Leading advocate for the ordination of women in the Episcopal Church. He was born in Mitchell, South Dakota. Wendt received his B.A. from George Washington University in 1948 and his S.T.B. from the General Theological Seminary in 1951. Wendt was ordained deacon on June 16, 1951... Read More »

(Dec. 18, 1708-Mar. 29, 1788). English hymn writer, priest, and missionary to colonial America. He was born in Epworth, England, the eighteenth child of Samuel and Susannah Wesley. Wesley graduated from St. Peter's College, Westminster, London, in 1721 and from Christ Church, Oxford, in 1726.... Read More »

(June 17, 1703-Mar. 2, 1791). Generally considered the founder of Methodism. He was born in Epworth, England, the fifteenth of nineteen children born to Samuel and Susannah Wesley. He entered Christ Church College, Oxford, in 1720 and was ordained deacon in 1725. After serving as a curate to his... Read More »

(Aug. 14, 1810-Apr. 19, 1876). English church musician and composer. He was born in London, the grandson of Charles Wesley. Wesley studied music at Oxford University and was organist at Hereford Cathedral, 1832-1835; Exeter Cathedral, 1835-1842; Leeds Parish Church, 1842-1849; Winchester Cathedral... Read More »

The 1982 General Convention voted to divide the Diocese of Tennessee into three dioceses-Tennessee, East Tennessee, and West Tennessee. The Diocese of West Tennessee includes the following counties: Benton, Carroll, Chester, Crockett, Decatur, Dyer, Fayette, Gibson, Hardeman, Hardin, Haywood,... Read More »

On Oct. 26, 1874, the General Convention voted to divide the Diocese of Texas and form the Missionary District of Northern Texas and the Missionary District of Western Texas. The primary convention of the Missionary District of Western Texas met at St. Mark's Church, San Antonio, on May 6-8,... Read More »

West Virginia was part of the Diocese of Virginia until 1877. The General Convention of 1877 created the Diocese of West Virginia, which held its primary convention at St. John's Church, Charleston, on Dec. 5-7, 1877. The diocese does not have a cathedral. It includes the entire state. Read More »

(Nov. 5, 1909-Jan. 3, 1990). Leading theologian and liturgist. He was born in Boston. West received his B.S. from Boston University in 1931 and his B.D. from the General Theological Seminary in 1934. He was ordained deacon on June 13, 1934, and priest on May 31, 1935. After seven years of ministry... Read More »

The 1892 General Convention voted to divide the Diocese of Colorado and establish the Missionary District of Western Colorado. The Missionary District of Western Colorado included the following counties: Archuleta, Delta, Dolores, Eagle, Garfield, Grand, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Mesa,... Read More »

See Gambier Observer.

This journal was published from Aug. 11, 1853, until June 25, 1868. It had various changes in ownership, editorship, name, and frequency of publication. It was succeeded and continued by the Standard of the Cross. Witness, The. Monthly journal published by the Episcopal Church Publishing Company.... Read More »

The 1901 General Convention voted to divide the Diocese of Kansas and form a Missionary District in the western part of the state. It was named the Missionary District of Salina and includes the following counties: Barber, Barton, Cheyenne, Clark, Cloud, Comanche, Decatur, Edwards, Ellis, Ellsworth... Read More »

The 1979 General Convention voted to divide the Diocese of Louisiana and establish a new diocese. The primary convention of the new diocese met at St. James Church, Alexandria, on Oct. 10-11, 1979. It voted to call itself the Western Diocese of Louisiana. It includes the following civil parishes (... Read More »

The 1901 General Convention voted to divide the Diocese of Massachusetts and create the Diocese of Western Massachusetts. The Diocese of Western Massachusetts includes the four counties of Berkshire, Franklin-Hampshire, Hampden, and Worcester. The primary convention of the Diocese met at Christ... Read More »

The General Convention of 1904 established the Missionary District of Mexico. The 1972 General Convention divided the Missionary District of Mexico into the Missionary District of Central and South Mexico, the Missionary District of Western Mexico, and the Missionary District of Northern Mexico. In... Read More »

The 1874 General Convention voted to divide the Diocese of Michigan and establish a new diocese. The primary convention of the new diocese met at St. Mark's Church, Grand Rapids, on Dec. 2, 1874. It chose the name the Diocese of Western Michigan. It includes the following counties: Allegan, Antrim... Read More »

The 1889 General Convention voted to divide the Diocese of Nebraska and create the Missionary District of The Platte. The name was changed to the Missionary District of Laramie in 1898 and to the Missionary District of Kearney in 1907. From Oct. 14, 1913, until Sept. 14, 1946, when the General... Read More »

The 1838 General Convention of voted to divide the Diocese of New York. This was the first division of a diocese and the first diocese that did not follow state lines. The primary convention of the Diocese of Western New York met at Trinity Church, Geneva. The 1868 General Convention divided the... Read More »

The diocese was created in Oct. 1895 when the General Convention voted to divide the Diocese of North Carolina. It was first called the Missionary District of Asheville and held its primary convention at Trinity Church, Asheville, Nov. 12-13, 1895. On Apr. 26, 1922, the convention voted to change... Read More »

On Oct. 26, 1874, the General Convention divided Texas into the Diocese of Texas and the Missionary Districts of Northern Texas and Western Texas. The primary convention of the Missionary District of Western Texas met at St. Mark's Church, San Antonio, May 6-8, 1875. The Missionary District... Read More »

See Seabury-Western Theological Seminary.

(Dec. 25, 1695-May 15, 1760). One of the Yale Converts. He was born in Middletown, Connecticut. Wetmore graduated from Yale College in 1714, and was ordained a Congregational minister in Nov. 1718. In Sept. 1722, while pastor of the First Congregational Church in New Haven, Connecticut, he and... Read More »

It was founded in 1858 by the Rev. Charles Gillette (1813-Mar. 6, 1869), and named after his wife, Mary Ann Wharton. The school received its charter on Feb. 11, 1860, and closed in 1865.

(May 25, 1748-July 23, 1833). An organizer of the Episcopal Church. He was born in St. Mary's County, Maryland. Wharton was raised a Roman Catholic, and in 1760 he entered the Jesuit college at Saint-Omer, France. He was ordained a Roman Catholic priest on Sept. 19, 1772, and then became a... Read More »

(Mar. 7, 1820-Feb. 21, 1889). Lawyer, priest, and government official. He was born in Philadelphia. Wharton graduated from Yale College in 1839 and then studied law. He was admitted to the Pennsylvania bar in 1843. Wharton became active in the Episcopal Church after the death of his wife in 1854.... Read More »

(Feb. 15, 1822-Sept. 16, 1901). Bishop and missionary to American Indians. He was born in Adams, Jefferson County, New York. Whipple studied at the Oberlin Collegiate Institute but did not receive a degree. He was raised a Presbyterian, but he decided to study for ordained ministry in the Episcopal... Read More »

(1585-Mar. 1617). The "Apostle of Virginia." He was born in Cambridge, England. Whitaker received his B.A. in 1604/1605 and his M.A. from Cambridge University in 1608. He was ordained a priest in the Church of England. After serving several years in England, he came to the Virginia colony in 1611.... Read More »

(Dec. 27, 1854-July 6, 1925). Priest and noted canon lawyer. He was engaged in law before studying theology. He was ordained deacon on Dec. 18, 1887, and priest on Oct. 31, 1888. He taught canon law at the General Theological Seminary, Bexley Hall, and Western Theological Seminary. White was a... Read More »

(Apr. 12, 1870-Apr. 15, 1935). Member of an Anglican religious order and co-founder of the Society of the Atonement. She was born in New York City. On Oct. 17, 1894, she became a postulant in the Community of the Sisters of the Holy Child. On Sept. 25, 1896, she took the vows of poverty, obedience... Read More »

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Glossary definitions provided courtesy of Church Publishing Incorporated, New York, NY,(All Rights reserved) from "An Episcopal Dictionary of the Church, A User Friendly Reference for Episcopalians," Don S. Armentrout and Robert Boak Slocum, editors.