An Episcopal Dictionary of the Church

A - Z Glossary

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Glossary

A pious fellowship or guild that promotes the Christian life of its members and may include other religious purposes such as evangelism or outreach to the needy. Although the term has been associated with Roman Catholic laity, there have been Anglican and Episcopal sodalities. See Living Rosary of... Read More »

The solemn collects are derived from the most ancient western form of the prayers of the people. The biddings date from the third or fourth century, and the collects date from the fifth century. The ancient solemn collects appear in the Gelasian and Gregorian sacramentaries. The practice of... Read More »

See Eremitic; see Hermit, Hermitess.

This 1980 hymnal supplement was intended to broaden the forms of musical expression available to the church. It was produced under the direction of the Standing Commission on Church Music as No. IV in the Church Hymnal Series. George E. Mims served as music editor. This hymnal supplement includes... Read More »

This supplement to The Hymnal (1940) was prepared by the Joint Commission on Church Music and approved by the 1970 General Convention. It was published in 1971. The general editor was Norman C. Mealy.

Theology of salvation. Theological reflection on the meaning of salvation in Christ and how we may share salvation by faith. Salvation is eternal life in the fullness of God's love. In Christ, we are redeemed from sin and death and restored to right relationship with God. We are made righteous... Read More »

The spiritual nature of a human being, as distinguished from the bodily or physical nature. This distinction is reflected in Eucharistic Prayer I, which states, "here we offer and present unto thee, O Lord, our selves, our souls and bodies. . . ." (BCP, p. 336). Scriptural sources and Christian... Read More »

Critical study of the sources of the NT gospels. Given the similarity yet individuality of the synoptic gospels, nineteenth-century scholars sought to find a way to determine the gospels' historical connection to each other. They sought to determine the sources that were used by the authors of... Read More »

The first convention of this diocese was held on May 12, 1785, at the State House in Charles Town. The 1922 General Convention voted to divide the diocese. The Diocese of South Carolina includes the following counties: Allendale, Bamberg, Barnwell, Beaufort, Berkeley, Calhoun, Charleston,... Read More »

The House of Bishops established the Missionary District of Dakota in 1868, and in 1871 it established the Missionary District of Niobrara. On Oct. 11, 1883, the House of Bishops divided the Missionary District of Dakota into the Missionary District of North Dakota and the Missionary District of... Read More »

The 1892 General Convention voted to divide the Diocese of Florida. The Missionary Jurisdiction of Southern Florida included all the counties in Florida south of the counties of Leon, Alachua, Putman and St. John's. The first convocation of the Missionary District was held Feb. 21-22, 1893, at... Read More »

The 1969 General Convention voted to divide the Diocese of South Florida into three dioceses. One of the three dioceses had the temporary name of the East Coast Diocese of Florida, but at the primary convention at Holy Trinity Church, West Palm Beach, Oct. 8, 1969, the name was changed to the... Read More »

The 1904 General Convention established the Missionary District of Mexico. The 1972 General Convention divided the Missionary District of Mexico into the Missionary District of Central and South Mexico, the Missionary District of Western Mexico, and the Missionary District of Northern Mexico. All... Read More »

The mission to Brazil began on Aug. 31, 1889, when James Watson Morris (1859-1954) and Lucien Lee Kinsolving (1862-1929) sailed for Brazil as missionaries. On Oct. 20, 1898, the House of Bishops elected Kinsolving Bishop for the United States of Brazil. The 1907 General Convention established the... Read More »

This journal began publication on Jan. 2, 1835, at Richmond, Virginia. It was published weekly, and had the motto: "Catholic For Every Truth of God. Protestant For Every Error of Man." On July 12, 1947, it absorbed The Chronicle, which was published at Poughkeepsie, New York. On Jan. 2, 1952, it... Read More »

1) This journal was published irregularly at Charleston, South Carolina, in 1854-1855, 1858-1859, and 1863. The first issue appeared on Apr. 1, 1854, and the last issue was dated Mar. 7, 1863. 2) A publication of the Southern Episcopal Church, a conservative church that was founded in 1962.... Read More »

The General Convention of 1892 voted to divide the Diocese of Florida. The Missionary District of Southern Florida existed until 1923, when it became the Diocese of South Florida. See South Florida, Diocese of.

The 1874 General Convention voted to divide the Diocese of Ohio. The primary convention of the Diocese of Southern Ohio was held at Trinity Church, Columbus, Jan. 13, 1875. It includes the following counties: Adams, Athens, Belmont, Brown, Butler, Champaign, Clark, Clermont, Clinton, Drake,... Read More »

The 1901 General Convention established the Missionary District of the Philippines. In 1973 the Missionary District of the Philippines was divided into three missionary districts. One of these was the Southern Philippines Missionary District. In 1985 it became the Diocese of the Southern... Read More »

The 1892 General Convention voted to divide the Diocese of Virginia. The new diocese was the Diocese of Southern Virginia. It held its primary convention at St. Paul's Church, Lynchburg. The 1919 General Convention voted to divide the Diocese of Southern Virginia. It includes the following... Read More »

(July 5, 1812-Apr. 12, 1894). Missionary Bishop to Greece. He was born in Portland, Maine. Southgate graduated from Bowdoin College in 1832. He then entered Andover Theological Seminary to study for the Congregational ministry. While at Andover he joined the Episcopal Church and was confirmed on... Read More »

The General Convention of 1969 voted to divide the Diocese of Florida into three dioceses. One of the new dioceses was known as the Gulf Coast Diocese of Florida. It included the following counties: Charlotte, Collier, DeSoto, Glades, Hernando, Hillsborough, Lee, Manatee, Pasco, Pinellas, Sarasota... Read More »

The 1835 General Convention nominated the Rev. Francis Lister Hawks to exercise episcopal functions in the State of Louisiana and in the Territories of Arkansas and Florida. Hawks declined the election and was never consecrated. On Dec. 9, 1838, Leonidas Polk was consecrated Missionary Bishop of... Read More »

On Sept. 30, 1949, the House of Bishops divided the Missionary District of Southern Brazil into three missionary districts-Southwestern Brazil, Southern Brazil, and Central Brazil. On Oct. 20, 1964, the House of Bishops voted for an independent Brazilian Church, and in 1965 the Episcopal Church of... Read More »

The 1832 General Convention voted that the dioceses of Mississippi and Alabama, and the clergy and churches in the State of Louisiana could associate and join in the election of a bishop. Delegations from these three areas met at Christ Church, New Orleans, on Mar. 4-5, 1835, and formed the... Read More »

The 1919 General Convention voted to divide the Diocese of Southern Virginia. The primary convention of the Diocese of Southwestern Virginia was held at St. John's Church, Roanoke, Dec. 10-11, 1919. The Diocese is composed of the following counties: Alleghany, Amherst, Augusta, Bath, Bedford,... Read More »

(Mar. 13, 1865-Sept. 25, 1914). A leading advocate of the Social Gospel, known as the "socialist bishop." He was born in Erie, Pennsylvania. He graduated from Princeton in 1887 and from the General Theological Seminary in 1901. He was ordained deacon on June 3, 1891, and began his ministry as... Read More »

(Mar. 12, 1801-Jan. 17, 1874). Leading evangelical theologian and opponent of Tractarianism. He was born in Charlestown, Massachusetts. His family moved to Huron County, Ohio, and Sparrow became involved with the educational enterprises of Bishop Philander Chase. He taught at a school in... Read More »

This monthly journal was published by the Board of Missions of the Episcopal Church. The first issue appeared in Jan. 1836, and the last issue appeared in Dec. 1939. It was continued by Forth. The Spirit of Missions is one of the major primary sources for the history of the Episcopal Church.... Read More »

A person, lay or ordained, with whom one communicates concerning the spiritual life may also be known as a soul-friend, soul-mate, or spiritual companion. A director listens and, when appropriate, responds by giving "direction" which may include spiritual advice, help with discernment, suggested... Read More »

Also called charisms, and partially listed in 1 Cor 12:4-11, these are graces granted by the Holy Spirit to empower the faithful to perform specific tasks. Called gratiae gratis datae (freely given graces) by the scholastics, they are at the service of charity (1 Cor 13:13). Given over and above... Read More »

An interest and intentional participation in the spiritual life, providing a context for open and direct experience of God and the entire spiritual realm at an intensely personal level. Spirituality concerns the whole of life in the context of faith. Resources for spirituality include participation... Read More »

On Oct. 13, 1853, the General Convention created the Missionary District of Oregon and Washington Territory. On Oct. 15, 1880, the General Convention divided it into the Missionary District of Oregon and the Missionary District of Washington. On Oct. 20, 1892, the General Convention divided the... Read More »

The 1877 General Convention voted to divide the Diocese of Illinois into the dioceses of Illinois, Quincy and Springfield. The primary convention of the Diocese of Springfield met at St. Paul's Church, Springfield, Dec. 18-19, 1877. It includes the following counties: Carr, Champaign,... Read More »

St

Andrew's College, Jackson, Mississippi. St. Andrew's College opened on Jan. 1, 1852, with the Rev. Meyer Lewin (1816-1886) as president. It was under the jurisdiction of the Diocese of Mississippi. It received its charter on Oct. 16, 1852, and was the first college with its own grounds... Read More »

Founded by Bishop Frederic Dan Huntington of Central New York, it opened on Sept. 16, 1876, and closed in 1905. The school's principal scholar was the Rev. Dr. William Dexter Wilson, who was dean, 1880-1900. Read More »

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Glossary definitions provided courtesy of Church Publishing Incorporated, New York, NY,(All Rights reserved) from "An Episcopal Dictionary of the Church, A User Friendly Reference for Episcopalians," Don S. Armentrout and Robert Boak Slocum, editors.