Anglican, Episcopal, Lutheran leaders issue pastoral letter for 10th anniversary of full communion

April 25, 2011

Anglican, Episcopal and Lutheran leaders in the United States and Canada have issued a joint pastoral letter to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the churches' full-communion relationships saying that they "look forward to the development of fuller relationships that will lead to a common mission, ministry, and witness in the world."

"Called to Common Mission," the full-communion agreement between the Episcopal Church and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, and "The Waterloo Declaration," between the Anglican Church of Canada and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, both took effect in 2001. But no formal agreements exist between the different denominations across the border, a situation the leaders hope to change.

On May 1, Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America Presiding Bishop Mark Hanson, Anglican Church in Canada Archbishop Fred Hiltz and Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada National Bishop Susan Johnson will participate in unique simultaneous liturgies on either side of the U.S.-Canadian border.

Johnson will preside and Jefferts Schori will preach at St. Paul's Anglican Church, Fort Erie, Ontario. Hanson will preside and Hiltz will preach at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, Buffalo, New York (Diocese of Western New York). Both services will begin at 3 p.m. EDT.

The celebrations will include elements of the worship services of the four denominations.

"Ten years ago, when Lutherans and Anglicans in Canada and in the United States embarked on journeys of full communion with one another, we pledged our commitment to unity in Christ for the sake of the mission of Christ's church," the leaders said. "On this anniversary, we rejoice and give thanks for those places of cooperation and ministry that our agreements have enabled ... As we continue this journey, we call upon our pastors, bishops, and denominational and congregational leaders to active engagement in God's mission and an increase in their capacity for multiplying ministry in the world."

The leaders also recognized a common commitment to protect the earth and to "care for God's creation and for our neighbors" and acknowledged issues of immigration, particularly along the world's border, and committed to ongoing advocacy for comprehensive immigration reform.

"We are also aware that our own full communion arrangements reflect this border between our two countries: The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada and the Anglican Church in Canada are in full communion, and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the Episcopal Church are in full communion," they said. "We ask our four churches to explore ways to formalize our relationships and deepen the partnerships between all four of our churches..."

Hanson said in an earlier statement that the May celebration will be "an important reminder that neither historic divisions between churches nor boundaries between our nations are obstacles for sharing mission and ministry together."

"We put our trust and hope in Christ, who has led us thus far in these relationships," the leaders said. "With boldness we venture now with a time of breaking new ground, planting more seeds, and tending them in the spirit of authentic partnership in the Gospel. With humility we offer all our labors to the Lord, hoping they take us and all our brothers and sisters in Christ towards a fuller realization of that unity for which he prays."

The full text of the pastoral letter in English and Spanish follows.

 


 

A Pastoral Letter On the Occasion of the 10th Anniversary Celebration of Full Communion: Anglican Church of Canada, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the Episcopal Church

May 1, 2011

Grace to you and peace.

Ten years ago, when Lutherans and Anglicans in Canada and in the United States embarked on journeys of full communion with one another, we pledged our commitment to unity in Christ for the sake of the mission of Christ's church. On this anniversary, we rejoice and give thanks for those places of cooperation and ministry that our agreements have enabled. We are mindful that our commemorations in Buffalo and Fort Erie this day take place during the great Fifty Days of Easter. As the Resurrected Lord breathed his Spirit onto his disciples and commanded them to preach the Gospel to the ends of the earth, we continue to ask for God's Holy Spirit to empower us continually to live together into that call.

We have chosen a place near the border between our countries to celebrate our historic agreements, to provide a unified witness to the saving grace of our Lord Jesus, to share our commitment for renewal in Christ's Church and God's creation, and to serve our neighbor in need.

As we continue this journey, we call upon our pastors, bishops, and denominational and congregational leaders to active engagement in God's mission and an increase in their capacity for multiplying ministry in the world.

We recognize God's call to serve and protect Earth in the face of unprecedented global threats to our air, land, and water. Principles of justice call us to live more sustainably as individuals and in community, and to work for systemic changes that support care for God's creation and for our neighbors. We acknowledge that our economy is based upon a worldview that sees creation as "resource" rather than sacred, of intrinsic worth, and "very good." As a result we often plunder creation, and the well-being of low-income and minority communities, as well as other-than-human communities, suffer. We call upon our congregations and institutions to advocate for and embody a more sustainable, compassionate economy. We also challenge our congregations and institutions to make choices and support policies to reduce our collective consumption of energy, thereby reducing the pollution and climate change that stems from the burning of fossil fuels. We call upon our four churches to work together in matters of environmental justice.

As people of faith, we have a strong tradition of helping our neighbor in need. These acts of charity are an integral expression of our faith and help meet the immediate needs of people living in poverty and those hit by disaster. Now is the time to work for justice as well, to advocate for more substantial long-term solutions that will create an anti-poverty agenda which we can all support. We will continue to encourage members of our congregations to meet immediate needs but also ask them to join together and pressure our governments to focus seriously on reducing poverty. We must continue to advocate for decent employment and to enhance our social safety net -- and to ensure that all have the opportunity to access both. Working together on matters of poverty and economic justice is an area where our four churches can forge an important common witness.

Meeting along the border of our countries, we are painfully aware of the issues of immigration and of people who lack lawful immigration status along other borders in the world. In our own context, we are mindful of those who have migrated to our countries to join their families, to work, or to seek refuge from persecution or violence. Countless families are separated by stringent immigration laws. As Christians, we are compelled by Christ's life and teachings to welcome the stranger as neighbor, serving, as Christ did, those who are marginalized. In our national and international ministries with and for migrants and refugees, we continue to advocate for comprehensive immigration reform.

We acknowledge that almost all of us are immigrants ourselves: we live in nations built on land taken from others. Our churches have long involvement in mission and evangelism among First Peoples. Sadly we have an equally long history of marginalization and oppression, often through church-run boarding schools, whose main goals were assimilation and the eradication of First Peoples' culture and heritage. As we atone for the past, we call upon our churches to continue processes of dialogue, healing, and reconciliation. Today, the definition of Evangelism and Mission has transformed into partnerships with First Peoples and their ministries walking side by side with Christ.

We are also aware that our own full communion arrangements reflect this border between our two countries: The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada and the Anglican Church in Canada are in full communion, and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the Episcopal Church are in full communion. We ask our four churches to explore ways to formalize our relationships and deepen the partnerships between all four of our churches. On the basis of Called to Common Mission and the Waterloo Declaration, we look forward to the development of fuller relationships that will lead to a common mission, ministry, and witness in the world.

We put our trust and hope in Christ, who has led us thus far in these relationships. With boldness we venture now with a time of breaking new ground, planting more seeds, and tending them in the spirit of authentic partnership in the Gospel. With humility we offer all our labors to the Lord, hoping they take us and all our brothers and sisters in Christ towards a fuller realization of that unity for which he prays.

In the words of the Waterloo Declaration, "We rejoice in our Declaration as an expression of the visible unity of our churches in the one Body of Christ. We are ready to be co-workers with God in whatever tasks of mission serve the Gospel. We give glory to God for the gift of unity already ours in Christ, and we pray for the fuller realization of this gift in the entire church."

In the words of Called to Common Mission, "We do not know to what new, recovered, or continuing tasks of mission this Concordat will lead our churches, but we give thanks to God for leading us to this point. We entrust ourselves to that leading in the future, confident that our full communion will be a witness to the gift and goal already present in Christ, 'so that God may be all in all.'"

The Rev. Mark S. Hanson
Presiding Bishop
The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

The Most Rev. Fred Hiltz
Archbishop and Primate
The Anglican Church of Canada

The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori
Presiding Bishop and Primate
The Episcopal Church

The Rev. Susan C. Johnson
National Bishop
Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada

 


 

Carta Pastoral en Ocasión de la Celebración del 10 º Aniversario de Comunión Plena: Iglesia Anglicana de Canadá, la Iglesia Evangélica Luterana de Canadá, la Iglesia Evangélica Iglesia Luterana de América y la Iglesia Episcopal

1 de mayo 2011

Gracia y paz a ustedes.

Hace diez años, cuando los luteranos y los anglicanos de Canadá y de Estados Unidos nos embarcamos en viajes hacia la comunión plena, prometimos nuestro compromiso a la unidad en Cristo por el bien de la misión de la iglesia de Cristo. En este aniversario, nos alegramos y damos gracias por aquellos lugares de cooperación y ministerio que nuestros acuerdos han hecho posibles. Somos conscientes de que nuestras conmemoraciones en Buffalo y Fort Erie este día tienen lugar durante los gran cincuenta días de Pascua. Como el Señor Resucitado sopló su Espíritu sobre sus discípulos y les mandó a predicar el Evangelio hasta los confines de la tierra, continuamos pidiendo al Espíritu Santo de Dios que nos capacite continuamente para vivir juntos ese llamado.

Hemos escogido un lugar cerca de la frontera entre nuestros países para celebrar nuestros acuerdos históricos, para ofrecer un testimonio unificado de la gracia salvadora de nuestro Señor Jesucristo, para compartir nuestro compromiso de renovación en la Iglesia de Cristo y en la creación de Dios, y para servir a nuestro prójimo necesitado.

A medida que continuamos este viaje, hacemos un llamado a nuestros pastores, obispos y a los líderes de las denominaciones y de las congregaciones para que activen una participación en la misión de Dios y un aumento en su capacidad de multiplicar el ministerio en el mundo.

Reconocemos el llamado de Dios a servir y proteger a la Tierra en vista de las amenazas mundiales sin precedentes a nuestro aire, tierra y agua. Los principios de la justicia nos piden que vivamos de una manera más sostenible personalmente y en comunidad, y que trabajemos para lograr los cambios sistémicos que apoyen el cuidado de la creación de Dios y de nuestros vecinos. Reconocemos que nuestra economía se basa en una visión del mundo que ve la creación como un "recurso" en lugar de algo sagrado, de valor intrínseco y "muy bueno". Como resultado, a menudo saqueamos la creación, y así sufre el bienestar de comunidades de bajos ingresos y de minorías, así como otras realidades más allá de las comunidades humanas. Pedimos a nuestras congregaciones e instituciones que promuevan y encarnen una economía más sostenible y compasiva. También desafiamos a nuestras congregaciones e instituciones a que tomen decisiones y apoyen normas para reducir nuestro consumo colectivo de energía, reduciendo así la contaminación y el cambio climático que se deriva de la quema de combustibles fósiles. Hacemos un llamado a nuestras cuatro iglesias a que trabajemos juntos en asuntos de justicia ambiental.

Como pueblo de fe, tenemos una fuerte tradición de ayudar a nuestro prójimo necesitado. Estas obras de caridad son una expresión integral de nuestra fe y ayudan a satisfacer las necesidades inmediatas de las personas que viven en la pobreza y a los afectados por desastres. Este es el momento de trabajar también por la justicia, para abogar por soluciones más substanciales a largo plazo, que creen un programa de lucha contra la pobreza que todos podamos apoyar. Vamos a seguir alentando a los miembros de nuestras congregaciones a que satisfagan las necesidades inmediatas, pero también les pedimos que se unan y presionen a nuestros gobiernos para que se centren seriamente en la reducción de la pobreza. Debemos continuar abogando por un empleo decente y por una mejora de nuestra red de seguridad social - y continuar garantizando que todos tengan la oportunidad de acceder a ambos. El trabajar juntos en cuestiones de pobreza y justicia económica es un área donde nuestras cuatro iglesias pueden forjar un testimonio común importante.

Al reunirnos en la frontera de nuestros países, somos dolorosamente conscientes de los problemas de la inmigración y de las personas que carecen de estatus legal de inmigración a lo largo de todas las fronteras del mundo. En nuestro propio contexto, somos conscientes de los que han emigrado a nuestros países a unirse con sus familias para trabajar o buscar refugio de la persecución o de la violencia. Innumerables familias están separadas por rigurosas leyes de inmigración. Como cristianos, estamos obligados por la vida y las enseñanzas de Cristo a acoger al extranjero como vecino, y a servir, como Cristo lo hizo, a los que están marginados. En nuestros ministerios nacionales e internacionales con y hacia los migrantes y refugiados, continuamos abogando por una reforma migratoria integral.

Somos conscientes de que casi todos nosotros somos inmigrantes: vivimos en naciones construidas en terrenos quitados a otros. Nuestras iglesias tienen larga participación en la misión y evangelización de los Pueblos Originarios. Lamentablemente también contamos con una larga historia de marginación y opresión, a menudo a través de internados administrados por la iglesia, cuyos objetivos principales fueron la asimilación y la erradicación de la cultura y patrimonio de los Pueblos Originarios. A medida que expiamos por el pasado, hacemos un llamado a nuestras iglesias a continuar los procesos de diálogo, sanación y reconciliación. Hoy en día, la definición de Evangelismo y Misión se ha transformado en alianzas con los Pueblos Originarios y con sus ministerios caminando juntos con Cristo.

También somos conscientes de que nuestros propios arreglos de comunión plena reflejan esta frontera entre nuestros dos países: La Iglesia Evangélica Luterana de Canadá y la Iglesia Anglicana de Canadá están en comunión plena, y la Iglesia Evangélica Luterana de América y la Iglesia Episcopal están en comunión plena. Pedimos a nuestras cuatro iglesias que exploren la manera de formalizar nuestra relación y profundizar la colaboración entre nuestras cuatro iglesias. Sobre la base de Llamados a la misión común y la Declaración de Waterloo, esperamos con interés el desarrollo de relaciones más plenas que conduzcan a una misión, ministerio y testimonio en común en el mundo.

Colocamos nuestra confianza y esperanza en Cristo, que nos ha conducido hasta ahora en estas relaciones. Con audacia nos lanzamos ahora a una época de abrir nuevos caminos, de sembrar más semillas y atenderlas con el espíritu de una auténtica asociación en el Evangelio. Con humildad, le ofrecemos todo nuestro trabajo al Señor, en la esperanza de que nos lleve y a todos nuestros hermanos y hermanas en Cristo hacia una realización más plena de esa unidad por la que él ora.

En las palabras de la Declaración de Waterloo: "Nos regocijamos en nuestra Declaración como una expresión de la unidad visible de nuestras iglesias en el único Cuerpo de Cristo. Estamos dispuestos a ser colaboradores con Dios en cualquier tarea misionera de servir al Evangelio. Damos gloria a Dios ya por el don de nuestra unidad en Cristo, y oramos por la realización más plena de este don en toda la iglesia".

En las palabras de Llamados a la misión común: "No sabemos a qué nuevas, recuperadas o continuas tareas misioneras conducirá este Concordato a nuestras iglesias, pero damos gracias a Dios por guiarnos hasta este punto. Nos encomendamos a ese liderazgo para el futuro, confiando en que nuestra comunión plena sea testigo del don y objetivo ya presentes en Cristo, 'para que Dios sea todo en todos'".

El Rvdmo. Mark S. Hanson
Obispo Presidente
La Iglesia Evangélica Luterana en América

El Rvdmo. Fred Hiltz
Arzobispo y Primado
La Iglesia Anglicana de Canadá

La Rvdma. Katharine Jefferts Schori
Obispa Presidente y Primado
La Iglesia Episcopal

La Rvdma. Susan C. Johnson
Obispa Nacional
La Iglesia Evangélica Luterana en Canadá